Monthly Archives: March 2014

Notes on New York Old & New

WE FREQUENTLY READ that New York is incomparably better today than 40 years ago. Yes and no. Crime is down, but buildings are up—to the degree that too much of a good thing is bad. Fifty-seventh Street will soon have … Continue reading

Share Button
Posted in Architecture, Classical, Culture, Current, Music, New York, Pedestrian, Urbanism, Veritas et Venustas | 1 Comment

An Oldie But Goodie—sung to the tune of “I Am the Very Model of a Modern Major General”

COLUMBIA ARCHITECTURE PROFESSOR and architectural historian Ken Frampton was once asked about “the cult of New Urbanism.” It’s “ersatz kitsch colonialism for the modern middle class”, he said. Faced with a statement like that, what can one do except write … Continue reading

Share Button
Posted in Architecture, Classical, Culture, Joke, Music, New Urbanism, Urbanism, Veritas et Venustas | Leave a comment

You Thought Architects Designed Perfect Chairs? (Good, Better, Best)

THIS EXCERPT from an old post at Veritas & Venustas comments on some of the same issues that Witold Rybczinski just wrote about in a post and a Tweet: Good, Better, Best (originally published February 2004) .. The concept is a … Continue reading

Share Button
Posted in Architecture, Classical, Culture, Current, Veritas et Venustas | Leave a comment

Vision Zero in New York City

On March 14, 2014, John Massengale and Victor Dover spoke at the Regional Plan Association to a roundtable group interested in the topic of Vision Zero in New York City.

Share Button
Posted in Architecture, Current, New Urbanism, New York, Urbanism, Video | Leave a comment

The Shard Is The New Freeway

The Shard, Dubai-on-Thames, Great Britain. Renzo Piano, 2003-2011. The tallest building in the EU. IN THE 20TH CENTURY, experts told cities across the country they needed in-city highways to successfully compete with modern metropolises. In the 21st century, “iconic towers” … Continue reading

Share Button
Posted in Architecture, Classical, Culture, Current, Urbanism | 4 Comments