MSG

Two MSG quotes: “In animal studies, injecting high doses of MSG into the brains of rats made them fat.” – Wikipedia

“Through Pennsylvania Station one entered the city like a god…. One scuttles in now like a rat” [under Madison Square Garden]* – Vincent Scully

PS: Archpaper called Governor Cuomo’s proposed Penn Station replacement “less soul-deflating” than its predecessor. The Empire State can do better than “less soul-deflating.”

Here at massengale.com, we support ReThinkNYC’s plan to rebuild McKim, Mead & White’s great station.

McKim, Mead & White Bonus: Spoke Up at the Hotel Pennsylvania

* McKim, Mead & White’s Pennsylvania Station is the best building ever torn down in New York City. Its destruction is widely said to be the turning point for historic preservation in the city.

The second greatest building ever torn down in New York City was McKim, Mead & White’s Madison Square Garden. Ironically, it is the current Madison Square that is the biggest impediment to recreating the old Penn Station.

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Spoke Up at the Hotel Pennsylvania

CNU NYC is a member of the Empire Station Coalition that opposes Governor “Demo Dan” Cuomo’s plan to declare the blocks around Pennsylvania Station “blighted,” as part of an urban removal scheme for the area. Yesterday, several members of the Coalition spoke in front of the Hotel, supporting the Hotel Pennsylvania Preservation Society.

Here are my remarks:

The great Jane Jacobs wrote in The Death and Life of Great American Cities, “Streets and their sidewalks the main public places of a city are its most vital organs. Think of a city and what comes to mind? Its streets. If a city’s streets look interesting the city looks interesting if they look dull the city looks dull.”

Well, look around you. Look behind you. Continue reading

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A Halloween Story

Almost forty years ago, I successfully “flipped” a tiny old house in north Greenwich. The house was a little under two miles from the Westchester Airport, which is on the Greenwich border.

This was before 9/11, and you could arrive at the airport and be on the plane in less than 10 minutes if you ran. One morning I was scheduled to fly to Florida to speak at the University of Miami. Before leaving for the airport I had a call from the organizer of the event, and we got into a conversation about content. Suddenly he said, “What time is your flight? Don’t you need to go?” Continue reading

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TikTok Urbanism

TikTok Car Free Brooklyn Bridge

Car Free Brooklyn Bridge Uncropped

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We Built This City To Walk And Stroll

“What if we treated historic districts historically, making the cars accommodate the city, rather than the other way around?”

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Crain’s New York: Change the Streets & Change the City


My op-ed in Crain’s New York is in the magazine this week and has been online for more than a week. The online version is longer than the print version but is behind a paywall. You can buy access to both the magazine and the online articles for 8 weeks for $7. The print version of the op-ed is in a PDF (scroll down), and the full text is here:

The protest marches on our city streets demand our attention. But with Phase 1 of the Coronavirus Reopening starting today, we still need to think about how to use those public spaces to survive the fallout from the most widespread health crisis of our time. If we don’t pay attention now, it may be too late.

Even before the reopening, there were twice as many people driving into Manhattan as we saw at the lowest point in April. But when asked how we can prevent cars from coming back in higher numbers than ever in the next few weeks, Mayor de Blasio said New Yorkers will have to “improvise” how they get to work.

“I really want to push back on the notion that we can solve everything all the time,” de Blasio said.

That’s not good enough. Here’s a three-part plan for Open Streets that can help reopen and renew New York City.

Continue reading

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My Recent Op-Eds

New York Times
New York Daily News (print)
Crain’s New York Business (print)
Streetsblog NYC
City Limits

Many others in local papers and publications like the Berkshire Record and The Patent Trader. For a complete list, click here.

Bonus: Two Wall Street Journal Book Reviews (print)

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“I feel like it’s 1968,” says every reporter on CNN and MSNBC watching the protest marches.

In another, less grave context, I wrote about one of my favorite Harvard professors, who back in the 1980s talked about what he thought were connections between the 1960s and the 21st century (see below). Today, like the reporters on CNN and MSNBC, I watch the demonstrations and sometimes feel like we’re back in 1968, when black Americans rioted in cities across the country.

There were other riots and marches that year too. Students famously rioted in Paris, almost bringing down the French government. Czechs marched for “socialism with a human face” during the Prague Spring, until Russian troops rolled into the city with tanks and crushed the demonstrators. American students protesting Vietnam fought Chicago police outside the Democratic convention. One year later, the Stonewall Riots in Greenwich Village were the beginning of Gay Pride and Gay Liberation in America.

Continue reading

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#OpenBrooklynBridge

#OpenStreets + #CarFreeBroolynBridge = #OpenBrooklynBridge

Simple back-of-the-envelope calculations suggest that within one year motor vehicle traffic would decrease by 100%, bicycle traffic would increase more than 1100%, and there would be twice as many pedestrians as on the High Line.

Download the Car Free Brooklyn Bridge PDF

After Move NY Comes Slow NY

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My Streetsblog Op-Ed: If Not Now, When? Changing the Car Culture

“We worked for years to reduce car use. If everybody drives a car, there is no space for people, there is no space to move, there is no space for commercial activities outside the shops.” ~ Milan deputy mayor Marco Granelli

In normal times, we have too many cars moving around New York City. Why? Because we spend billions of dollars on roads and highways that encourage people to drive. Milan, Brussels, and Paris are all using Open Street experiments during the pandemic to permanently change the driving culture in their cities. Let’s not waste this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, New York.

Read the rest of the op-ed at Streetsblog.

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Quiet Streets – Making Lemonade from Lemons

Yorkville Promenade (Second Avenue), New York, New York, Massengale & Co LLC and Dover, Kohl & Partners, 2011. An aerial view looking south from 86th Street.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo and City Council Speaker Corey Johnson called for making New York City streets safer for pedestrians and social distancing while we all stay close to home. Mayor de Blasio responded with a program to open more space for pedestrians on one street per borough.

We can do more. We should use this time when traffic is light to work on ideas for safer, quieter, and more pleasant streets for pedestrians and cyclists now and in the future. During this COVID-19 crisis, we can implement ideas that are great for the long-term health of the city. Specifically, let’s make some of our quiet side-streets primarily for cyclists and walkers.

Quiet Streets (continue reading at Streetsblog)

More Photos at Slow New York
Download a PDF

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A Chicane Is Not A Shared Space Place

Looking north on University Place towards the 14th Street Busway. Manhattan’s newest slow street.

A space is only a place if people want to be there. The chicane shown above is for traffic calming, not placemaking. Putting that another way, it’s a product of traffic engineering, not a piece of urban design.

I understand this design is a step towards something better, which is slower, safer streets in New York City. I support that, but there’s no reason it can’t be a better place for people than it is. This is supposed to be a shared-space street, and there are better ways to get to that goal.

We know from social science and neuroscience studies that both our conscious and unconscious thoughts gravitate to beauty and seek to avoid ugliness. Our conscious minds might think the “flexible delineator posts” make sense and don’t look too bad, but our unconscious self is repelled. It sees the cheap plastic sticks and other cues that mark the space as a place for machines, and it knows that’s a dangerous place for humans.

The easiest way to make a place for people on a straight street is to line everything up: the buildings, the sidewalks, the trees, the roadway, and even the paint (if there is paint—see below). Continue reading

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Streets for People, or Streets for Profit?

My Op-Ed at City Limits (click to read)

Excerpt:

AVs will be programmed to stop immediately if a pedestrian steps in front of them to cross the street—and we all know that given the opportunity, New Yorkers will do that all day. That would make Manhattan traffic move even more slowly than it does now.

Companies that have invested billions of dollars in self-driving cars will do their best to stop that. There is already talk of facial-recognition software to identify the pedestrian troublemakers interrupting traffic. Pedestrians and motor vehicles will be even more strictly segregated than they are now. This goes against one of the most popular trends in street use today, which is a movement towards what is known as “shared space.”

Alternative titles:

Google, Uber, and the Road Ahead
Big Tech + Big Finance = Organized Motordom 2.0
Coming Soon To A Street Near You

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Architecture Is Frozen Music

Imagine the following scenario. There are some problems with it, but you’ll get the point.

The Berlin Philharmonic has the only sheet music for Mozart’s Requiem. One day, a fire destroys the last 10 pages.

Angela Merkel announces that the National Treasure will be restored within 3 years, before the World Music Festival in Berlin in 2023.

The Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung proposes that Philip Glass rewrite the ending in a minimalist style appropriate for our time.

(continue reading at the CNU Public Square)

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Philip Johnson Quote of the Day

Philip [Johnson] was always a perfect gentleman of the old school. But once I saw his wit and grace take an almost grandfatherly form.

It was at the end of a splendid fall day that I had spent with him at New Canaan, reporting an article I was writing for Vanity Fair. My wife and children arrived to pick me up. As he came out of the Glass House to greet them, casting long shadows in the golden, late afternoon sun, my then-four-year-old daughter surveyed the Empyrean scene and its ancient, white, wizard-ish lord.

He welcomed her, and she looked up at him and earnestly asked, “Were you here when the world first started?”

“At last,” he replied, taking her two little hands in his, “someone who ‘understands’ me.”

Told by Kurt Andersen at AIA NY

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